Skip To Content

1050 Burmeister Ave

Beckley, WV 25801
  • $99,000
  • STATUS: Active
  • ON SITE: 16 Days
  • MLS #: 22-1085
UPDATED: 111 min ago
$99,000
  • 0
    BEDS
  • N/A
    ACRES
  • 0
    BATHS
  • 0
    1/2 BATHS
Neighborhood:
Type:
Commercial
Built:
1906
County:
Area:

School Ratings & Info

Description

HISTORIC RALEIGH COAL & COKE POWERHOUSEBuilt in 1906, the brick-and-stone powerhouse designed for the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company is a locally important industrial landmark now being studied for eligibility on the National Register of Historic Places. Renowned for its unique architecture and associaton with the growth of the regional coal industry, the property remains a practicalATTRIBUTES AND HIGHLIGHTS Unique Historical Structure Brick & Stone Construction Workshop / Warehouse Proximity to I-77 and I-64 1.4 Miles From CSX Glen Morgan Depot Proximity to New River Gorge National Park & Preserve Proximity to Beckley Exhibition Coal Mine Proximity to Winterplace Ski Resort Market Area of 250,000 Residents Tourism Destination For Approximately 3 Million About Raleigh Coal & Coke Company One of the most powerful coal-mining interests in southern West Virginia in the early 1900s, the Raleigh Coal and Coke Co. pioneered the extraction of coal in the productive Beckley seam, which underlay much of the present city of Beckley. It operated six mines on the Piney Creek Branch of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, the first line owned by the railroad to be built off its mainline from the New River Gorge. The competing Virginian Railroad also built a line to the town. Raleigh Coal & Coke became influential in the expansion of neighboring Beckley, the commercial center of southern West Virginia. In 1929, it donated 60 acres for the development of a country club and golf course and 300 for the development of a exclusive residential neighborhood built to accomodate industry magnates and business leaders from throughout southern West Virginia. In 1950, the company ceased operations and divested its interests, selling off lots in the community of Raleigh. Through 2020, the community declined but has recently seen increased residential interest as a site for affordable housing. Property owners in and near the powerhouse have discussed pursuing the development of a national historic district that would preserve several period buildings that remain, including several residences and company buildings. LOCATION Google Coordinates: 37.7568574295393, -81.17029136442058 Address: 1050 Burmeister Ave., Beckley, WV 25801 Elevation Range: 2,160 feet above mean sea level HISTORY The powerhouse was among the first principal buildings built by the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company at Raleigh, a company-owned community established in 1898 to house employees and their families in central Raleigh County. The company opened six mines and swiftly became one of the state's chief coal producers, marketed under the trade name Black Knight Coal. By the late 1920s, the population of Raleigh had outpaced that of Beckley, and the company had become so successful that its officers organized the Black Knight Country Club, which featured a clubhouse, tennis courts, and a golf course raised on a hill above the town. Many of its successful officials and other investors built sizeable homes around the clubhouse. Often recognized as the architect of the company's success, Colonel Ernest Chilson (18691931) arrived at Raleigh in 1906 and established many of its first buildings, including the powerhouse. No records have yet been found identifying the builder who might have worked with Chilson. However, Chilson was highly regarded as a student of architecture himself and designed his own formidable home, "Casa Loma," high on a hill overlooking Raleigh near the country club. Chilson also directed the design of the country club with architect Alex Mahood (18881970), designer of many landmark buildings across West Virginia. However, Chilson was likely too young to have worked on the powerhouse. ARCHITECTURE The powerhouse building was designed to perform the all-important function of distributing electric power to mines, residences, and company-owned buildings throughout the community. However, its design also incorporated ornate architectural features that elevate the building above that of a merely practical structure. The powerhouse was, in reality, the nerve center of the company and town. Exterior The design of the building is more ornate than other industrial buildings in the region. It incorporates varied surface ornamentation, including red and yellow brick and uncoursed, rusticated stone. A band of molded concrete, a water table between its first and second stories, includes a swastika symbol that has attracted the attention of passersby for generations. However, the building was built long before the symbol gained a negative association. The first story and foundation are built of large blocks of rusticated sandstone block likely quarried in the area. The four sides of the first story are punctuated with double doors of iron. The first floor is approximately 10 feet high, and the second story is of like height. Each exterior wall is approximately 45 feet wide and 20 feet high. The second story above the ornamented water table is built principally of red and yellow brick punctuated by windows, seven per side, inset with steel, approximately three feet wide by six feet high. Metal letters commemorating the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company are affixed to the wall spaces between the windowsRC&CCO. The roof above the lower stories is hipped and of corrugated metal. It rises in two tiers 14 feet above its base from the top of the building's second story. The roof is divided between its top and lower tiers by a course approximately one foot high through which a range of lower voltage transmission lines extended outward to the town and mines. The ceramic-insulated holes through which the lines passed remain in place. A range of high-voltage transformers was installed on the patio of stone that flanks the northwest face of the building but was removed when the power was decommissioned as a power source in the 1950s. Interior The interior of the building consists chiefly of a single two-story space, 40 feet wide by 40 feet across and approximately 20 f

Monthly Payment Calculator



© 2022 Greenbrier Valley Board of REALTORS®. All rights reserved. IDX information is provided exclusively for consumers' personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the MLS or Greenbrier Real Estate Service. Data last updated: 2022-08-11T23:35:45.82.
www.greenbrierrealestateservice.com/homes/131291463
Print Image

1050 Burmeister Ave Beckley, WV 25801

  • Price: $99,000
  • Status: Active
  • On Site: 16 Days
  • Updated: 111 min ago
  • MLS #: 22-1085
0
Beds
0
Baths
0
½ Baths
N/A
Acres
1906
Built
Neighborhood:
Other
County:
Raleigh
Area:
Other
Property Description
HISTORIC RALEIGH COAL & COKE POWERHOUSEBuilt in 1906, the brick-and-stone powerhouse designed for the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company is a locally important industrial landmark now being studied for eligibility on the National Register of Historic Places. Renowned for its unique architecture and associaton with the growth of the regional coal industry, the property remains a practicalATTRIBUTES AND HIGHLIGHTS Unique Historical Structure Brick & Stone Construction Workshop / Warehouse Proximity to I-77 and I-64 1.4 Miles From CSX Glen Morgan Depot Proximity to New River Gorge National Park & Preserve Proximity to Beckley Exhibition Coal Mine Proximity to Winterplace Ski Resort Market Area of 250,000 Residents Tourism Destination For Approximately 3 Million About Raleigh Coal & Coke Company One of the most powerful coal-mining interests in southern West Virginia in the early 1900s, the Raleigh Coal and Coke Co. pioneered the extraction of coal in the productive Beckley seam, which underlay much of the present city of Beckley. It operated six mines on the Piney Creek Branch of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, the first line owned by the railroad to be built off its mainline from the New River Gorge. The competing Virginian Railroad also built a line to the town. Raleigh Coal & Coke became influential in the expansion of neighboring Beckley, the commercial center of southern West Virginia. In 1929, it donated 60 acres for the development of a country club and golf course and 300 for the development of a exclusive residential neighborhood built to accomodate industry magnates and business leaders from throughout southern West Virginia. In 1950, the company ceased operations and divested its interests, selling off lots in the community of Raleigh. Through 2020, the community declined but has recently seen increased residential interest as a site for affordable housing. Property owners in and near the powerhouse have discussed pursuing the development of a national historic district that would preserve several period buildings that remain, including several residences and company buildings. LOCATION Google Coordinates: 37.7568574295393, -81.17029136442058 Address: 1050 Burmeister Ave., Beckley, WV 25801 Elevation Range: 2,160 feet above mean sea level HISTORY The powerhouse was among the first principal buildings built by the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company at Raleigh, a company-owned community established in 1898 to house employees and their families in central Raleigh County. The company opened six mines and swiftly became one of the state's chief coal producers, marketed under the trade name Black Knight Coal. By the late 1920s, the population of Raleigh had outpaced that of Beckley, and the company had become so successful that its officers organized the Black Knight Country Club, which featured a clubhouse, tennis courts, and a golf course raised on a hill above the town. Many of its successful officials and other investors built sizeable homes around the clubhouse. Often recognized as the architect of the company's success, Colonel Ernest Chilson (18691931) arrived at Raleigh in 1906 and established many of its first buildings, including the powerhouse. No records have yet been found identifying the builder who might have worked with Chilson. However, Chilson was highly regarded as a student of architecture himself and designed his own formidable home, "Casa Loma," high on a hill overlooking Raleigh near the country club. Chilson also directed the design of the country club with architect Alex Mahood (18881970), designer of many landmark buildings across West Virginia. However, Chilson was likely too young to have worked on the powerhouse. ARCHITECTURE The powerhouse building was designed to perform the all-important function of distributing electric power to mines, residences, and company-owned buildings throughout the community. However, its design also incorporated ornate architectural features that elevate the building above that of a merely practical structure. The powerhouse was, in reality, the nerve center of the company and town. Exterior The design of the building is more ornate than other industrial buildings in the region. It incorporates varied surface ornamentation, including red and yellow brick and uncoursed, rusticated stone. A band of molded concrete, a water table between its first and second stories, includes a swastika symbol that has attracted the attention of passersby for generations. However, the building was built long before the symbol gained a negative association. The first story and foundation are built of large blocks of rusticated sandstone block likely quarried in the area. The four sides of the first story are punctuated with double doors of iron. The first floor is approximately 10 feet high, and the second story is of like height. Each exterior wall is approximately 45 feet wide and 20 feet high. The second story above the ornamented water table is built principally of red and yellow brick punctuated by windows, seven per side, inset with steel, approximately three feet wide by six feet high. Metal letters commemorating the Raleigh Coal & Coke Company are affixed to the wall spaces between the windowsRC&CCO. The roof above the lower stories is hipped and of corrugated metal. It rises in two tiers 14 feet above its base from the top of the building's second story. The roof is divided between its top and lower tiers by a course approximately one foot high through which a range of lower voltage transmission lines extended outward to the town and mines. The ceramic-insulated holes through which the lines passed remain in place. A range of high-voltage transformers was installed on the patio of stone that flanks the northwest face of the building but was removed when the power was decommissioned as a power source in the 1950s. Interior The interior of the building consists chiefly of a single two-story space, 40 feet wide by 40 feet across and approximately 20 f
Exterior Features

Construction Type Site-Built (Stick) Exterior BrickStone Foundation ConcreteStone Garage Type None Roofing Metal

Interior Features

Flooring Ceramic Tile Total Rooms 10 Utilities Air Conditioning None

Property Features

Flood Plain Unknown Style Warehouse Tax Year 2021 Taxes 87.94 Utilities Sewer City Utilities Water City Zoning Commercial

Listing information © 2022 Greenbrier Valley Board of REALTORS®, Inc.
Listing provided courtesy of Randy S. Burdette of Foxfire Realty.


© 2022 Greenbrier Valley Board of REALTORS®. All rights reserved. IDX information is provided exclusively for consumers' personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the MLS or Greenbrier Real Estate Service. Data last updated: 2022-08-11T23:35:45.82.
 
https://bt-photos.global.ssl.fastly.net/greenbrier/orig_boomver_1_22-1085-2.jpg https://bt-photos.global.ssl.fastly.net/greenbrier/orig_boomver_1_22-1085-2.jpg https://bt-photos.global.ssl.fastly.net/greenbrier/orig_boomver_1_22-1085-2.jpg
Logo
Greenbrier Real Estate Service
1047 Washington Street East
Lewisburg WV, 24901